Brandi J. Clark

Writer and Educator

Help! I Have to Teach Language Arts: A Language Arts Survival Mini-Course Part 3

 

You might need to Ketch-up!

Ketch up

 

You can find the previous lessons here – Lesson 1 and Lesson 2

By the way, thanks for hanging in there. I appreciate that you are taking the time to strengthen your skills as a teacher. Your students will appreciate that.

Knowing all this information is the difference between using a template and understanding the coding of a template.

I promise as you stay with this course you will understand how to connect all the smorgasbord of opportunities to take Language Arts to the max. I want you to be able to understand how to make your own Language Arts plans with the confidence to include web tools, Makerspace and Project-Based Learning.

So let’s keep going.

Today’s Lesson: Developing an Understanding of the Five General Outcomes

When I was able to dive deep and explore the contents of the five general outcomes, it opened up my world.

Among other things,  it makes it so much easier to link the content areas to language arts when the connections are made obvious.

Even though the general outcomes are listed separately they are in fact approached in the classroom as integrated with each other and the six language arts.

Here is a direct quote from the program of studies.

“The general outcomes are interrelated and interdependent; each is to be achieved through a variety of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing experiences.”

Nothing in language arts is really on its own and this is important to understand.

In my experience the isolation of skills and processes leads to learning out of context and without the possibility of transfer.

So here we go…

Outcome 1: Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences

Outcome 1

As mentioned in a prior post, outcome one  is all about students unpacking ideas, feelings and experiences whether this happens at the beginning, middle or end of a unit or lesson. In this outcome you can connect these processes: brainstorming, webbing, mind mapping, KWL charts, think-pair-share, anticipation guides, graffiti walls, place-mat activity, four corners, free writing, and quick writes.

Outcome 2: Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print and other media texts

Outcome 2 1

In the first section of Outcome 2 are your READING outcomes.  This is where you will find the support for phonics and comprehension strategy instruction. This is also your READER RESPONSE outcome. This outcome also suggests that reading a variety of texts is important as is examining them for AUTHOR’S PURPOSE. If you ever wondered where CLOSE READING fits, it fits here in outcome 2.

 

Outcome 2 2

The second section of Outcome 2 are your WRITING outcomes. Students will be using the variety of forms and genres encountered during reading instruction to create their own text. They will be experimenting with WORD CHOICE and collecting ideas to write about. If you have wondered where the WRITER’S NOTEBOOK fits, this is the general outcome to connect it to. Also there are connections to STORY WRITING  and CLOSE WRITING.

This outcome is “meaty” and requires a lot of attention in the language arts classroom.

Outcome 3: Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to manage ideas and information

Outcome 3 1

 

Outcome 3 2

This outcome is your NONFICTION outcome. It can and should be connected to the other CONTENT AREAS. If you wondered where PBL fits in language arts, it is here.

This is also your RESEARCH outcome.

Outcome 4: Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to enhance the clarity and artistry of communication

Outcome 4 1

In this half of outcome four we find SPELLING, WORD PLAY, EDITING, REVISION, CAPITALIZATION, PUNCTUATION and PRINTING/HANDWRITING.  This is the outcome focused on clarity and being precise.

Outcome 4 2

This half of outcome four is about PRESENTING to an audience and being an AUDIENCE member. If you wondered where AUTHOR’S CHAIR fits, it fits here.

Here is a direct quote from the program of studies.

“As students use English language arts in a variety of contexts with instruction, encouragement and support, they revise and edit to clarify meaning, achieve purposes and affect audiences.  In doing so, they apply the conventions of grammar, language usage, spelling, punctuation and capitalization.”

Think of outcome four as the Fix-em Up  and Presenting outcome.

Outcome 5: Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to respect, support and collaborate with others.

Outcome 5

This is your GROUP WORK and CELEBRATING outcome. This is where students can be taught skills to work in partnerships and larger groups. Similar to the other outcomes, this one fits well with the other content areas. Social Studies is another subject area that has outcomes directed at working in groups. I would suggest comparing and combining the L.A. and Social Studies outcomes.

Here are some direct quotes from the program of studies.

“Language is necessary for working together. Students learn collaboration skills by discussing in groups, by building on the ideas of others, and by planning and working together to meet common goals and strengthen community.  In every classroom, students develop a sense of community.  They learn to use language to offer assistance and to participate in and enrich their classroom community.  In this way, students share perspectives and ideas, develop understanding and respect diversity.”

“Students learn that language is important for celebrating events of personal, social, community and national significance.  In their language learning and use, they develop their knowledge of language forms and functions.  As well, they come to know how language preserves and enriches culture.  To celebrate their own use of language, students display their work, share with others, and delight both in their own and others’ use of the language arts.”

Think of this outcome as the group work and celebration of work outcome.

This marks the end of today’s lesson.

I know.

You want me to keep going.

But I want you to digest today’s learning.

Know the Five General Outcomes.

Think about the resources you have access to and how they might match up to the five general outcomes.

Trust me…everything else makes sense if you understand these five general outcomes.

Until Next Time,

Coach Brandi!

Next Lesson:  Understanding “Text” in the English Language Arts program of studies (K-9)

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Help! I Have to Teach Language Arts: A Language Arts Survival Mini-Course Part 2

 

You’re back!

Of course you are!

Here is the link to lesson 1 in case you missed the party.

Now…Lesson 2

In the last lesson we discussed the six language arts.

language artisits

Today’s Lesson: The Organization of the English Language Arts Program of Studies (K-9)

The English Language Arts program of studies is….

what you NEED to teach and what the students NEED to KNOW and be able to DO by the end of their grade level.

Each grade level has specific outcomes and we will get to that later.

BUT first let’s explore the whole document.

Let’s look at what is the same across the grade levels.

There are five general outcomes. So general, in fact, that they span from Kindergarten to grade 12.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to:
General Outcome 1: explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences
General Outcome 2:comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print and other media texts
General Outcome 3: manage ideas and information
General Outcome 4: enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
General Outcome 5: respect, support and collaborate with others

In order to make this clear, for comparison these are the general outcomes for Mathematics (grade 3).

General Outcome: Develop number sense

General Outcome: Use patterns to describe the world and to solve problems.

General Outcome: Represent algebraic expressions in multiple ways.

General Outcome: Use direct and indirect measurement to solve problems.

General Outcome: Describe the characteristics of 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, and analyze the relationships among them.

General Outcome: Collect, display and analyze data to solve problems.

Makes more sense now…right?  Language arts can be confusing because it lacks the obvious content that we find in most of the other subject areas.

Now let’s zoom in on parts of general outcome one as example to understand the organization of the entire program of studies.

This is general outcome one.

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.

In case you didn’t notice, I underlined the six arts.

Clever! You bet!

Let’s look at the ending of general outcome one.

Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.

Here is a sample from the Program of Studies unpacking the word exploratory and referring back to the six arts.

“Exploratory language is often oral.  Through talk and conversation, students make observations, ask questions, hypothesize, make predictions and form opinions.  Exploratory talk is often spontaneous. Sometimes students discover what they think at the point of utterance.  Exploratory writing also helps students clarify their thinking.  When students can see their ideas, thoughts, feelings and experiences in writing, they can reconsider, revise and elaborate on them in thoughtful ways. Representing is also used to explore ideas and interrelationships in diagrams, thought webs, charts and other visual media.  Exploratory listening, reading and viewing enable students to gather and verify information, identify areas for further inquiry or research, and develop support for opinions.”

As you can imagine, this outcome is all about students unpacking ideas, feelings and experiences whether this happens at the beginning, middle or end of a unit or lesson.

What processes match up with this outcome?

Some that come to my mind are brainstorming, webbing, mind mapping, KWL charts, think-pair-share, anticipation guides, graffiti walls, place-mat activity, four corners, free writing, and quick writes.

Each of the General Learning outcomes have subheadings. These subheadings further refine the general outcome and are the SAME from kindergarten to grade 9. In grades 10 to 12 the subheadings are different.

The subheadings for general outcome one are:

1.1. Discover and Explore

1.2  Clarify and Extend

Under each subheading there are side headings. These are the SAME for kindergarten to grade 9. In grades 10 to 12 the side headings are different.

SUB HEADING – 1.1 Discover and Explore

SIDE HEADING – Express ideas and understanding

SIDE HEADING – Experiment with language and forms

SIDE HEADING – Express Preferences

SIDE HEADING – Set goals

SUB HEADING -1.2 Clarify and Extend

SIDE HEADING – Consider the ideas of others

SIDE HEADING – Combine ideas

SIDE HEADING – Extend understanding

Let’s look back at the processes again.

Here they are…brainstorming, webbing, mind mapping, KWL charts, think-pair-share, anticipation guides, graffiti walls, place-mat activity, four corners, freewriting, and quick writes.

Can you see where these processes might match up with the side headings?

For example:

Brainstorming with Combine ideas

Quickwrites with Express ideas and understanding

Placemat Activity with Consider the ideas of others

These processes, with some modification, work across kindergarten to grade 9.

So if the general outcome, subheadings and side headings are the SAME what is DIFFERENT?

Confused

The specific outcomes are different and UNIQUE to each grade level.

For example:

General Outcome 1

Subheading: Discover and Explore

Side heading: Set Goals

Specific grade level outcomes as follows…..
Kindergarten: talk about own reading and writing experiences
Gr. 1 : choose to read and write for and with others
Gr. 2: recognize and talk about developing abilities as readers, writers and illustrators
Gr. 3: discuss areas of personal accomplishment as readers, writers and illustrators
Gr. 4: identify areas of personal accomplishment and areas for enhancement in language learning and use
Gr. 5: reflect on areas of personal accomplishment, and set personal goals to improve language learning and use
Gr. 6: assess personal language use, and revise personal goals to enhance language learning and use
Gr. 7: use appropriate terminology to discuss developing abilities in personal language learning and use
Gr. 8: examine and reflect on own growth in effective use of language to revise and extend personal goals
Gr. 9: reflect on own growth in language learning and use, by considering progress over time and the attainment of personal goals

The specific outcomes BUILD on the each other as students progress through the grades. Keep this mind as in future lessons we will discuss differentiation.

This marks the end of today’s lesson.

I know.

You want me to keep going.

But I want you to digest today’s learning.

Know the Organization of the English Language Arts Program of Studies (K- 9)

Think about the grade level you are planning to teach, are there some processes you are already familiar with?

Trust me…everything else makes sense if you understand how the program of studies is organized.

Until Next Time,

Coach Brandi!

Next Lesson: Developing an Understanding of the Five General Outcomes